Guides by LST
Helping you make more informed application and enrollment decisions
Last Updated: May 3, 2014
Scores in use, rates in use, other metrics

Scores in Use

Employment Score

The percentage of graduates who have successfully started a career in the practice of law, though it does not judge the quality of that start. We count only Bar Passage Required jobs while excluding Short-term and Part-time jobs, as well as self-employed Solo Practitioners. An asterisk will accompany the score if it includes school-funded jobs.

Under-Employment Score

The percentage of graduates underusing their skills and credentials. These are graduates who have not successfully started any professional career nine months after graduating law school. We count a graduate as underemployed when he or she is Unemployed – Seeking, pursuing an additional Advanced Degree, in a Non-professional job, or employed in a Short-term or Part-time job.

Unknown Score

The percentage of graduates for whom their Employment Status was not known, either through survey or investigation, to the law school. Indicates the degree of completeness and reliability of the Employment Score and Under-Employment Score.

Head's Up The Employment Score, Under-Employment Score, and Unknown Score do not necessarily add up to 100%. Click here to toggle a table showing what's included and excluded. Additional details on the decisions underlying these three scores are available here.

The Large Firm Score

The percentage of the entire class working in long-term, full-time jobs at law firms that employ 101 or more attorneys. Due to data limitations, this score may include paralegals and administrative staff.

The Public Service Score

The percentage of the entire class working in long-term, full-time public interest or long-term, full-time government jobs. This does not include those in the judicial clerkship category because those positions are almost always for a definite duration, nor those in the academic category because this category is notoriously fishy. It may also include non-legal jobs, from nonprofit administration to social worker. This score may be inflated by has school-funded jobs that are long-term and full-time. An asterisk will accompany the score if it may include school-funded jobs.

The Salary Response Score

The percentage of the entire class who reported a salary greater than $0. Note that the denominator includes those who could not have reported a salary because they were unemployed, pursuing another advanced degree, or did not respond to the school's survey at all. Unlike using total employed or total employed full time, the total graduating class denominator does not favor schools with a higher proportion of unemployed or unknown graduates.

Rates in Use

The Destination Rate

The percentage of the entire class that obtained any job in the state the rate reflects. For now, data limitations limit our ability to analyze the kinds of jobs obtained by destination outcome, though schools have the data to let you do an analysis.

The Law Firm Rates

We use three separate categories of long-term, full-time law firm jobs on our reports: 2-25 attorney firms, 26-100 attorney firms, and 101+ attorney firms. The rate is the percentage of the entire class working at the particular kind of employer. It does not reflect the type of job the graduate works, so these rates may include paralegals and administrative staff.

The Federal Clerkship Rate

The percentage of the entire class that obtained long-term, full-time federal clerkships. Keep in mind that these "long-term" jobs usually have a duration of one year, though sometimes graduates obtain two-year appointments or "career clerk" positions.

The State & Local Clerkship Rate

The percentage of the entire class that obtained long-term, full-time state, local, or other clerkships. State clerkships have similar terms as federal clerkships.

The School-Funded Rate

The percentage of the entire class working in jobs funded by the law school. The school funds are typically very modest stipends. At some schools, students may work in private positions, but the vast majority require that the student volunteer at a nonprofit or government office.

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